Showing posts with label Arm. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Arm. Show all posts

Tuesday, January 9, 2018

Radioulnar Ligaments


We just learned about the Ulnar Collateral Ligament in the elbow.

The two bones in the forearm are connected together by a few ligaments that hold on to them, like strings strapping the two bones together.

The Proximal Radioulnar Articulation is by the elbow, and the Distal Radioulndar Articulation is by the wrist.



(from: wikipedia - annular ligament of radius)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Enteric Nervous System

Tuesday, January 2, 2018

Ulnar Collateral Ligament


We just learned about the Humeroradial Ligaments or RCL that connects the upper arm called the humerus to one of the forearm bones called the radius.

Another bunch of connective tissue connects the humerus to the other forearm bone called the ulna.
This is the Ulnar Collateral Ligament, sometimes just called the UCL.

Just like the RCL, the UCL helps hold the elbow joint together when you move your arm around.


(from: wikipedia - ulnar collateral ligament of elbow joint)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Parasympathetic Nervous System

Tuesday, December 26, 2017

Humeroradial Ligaments


We just learned about the Glenhumoral Ligaments in the shoulder.

Another piece of connective tissue is the Humeroradial Ligaments.

The upper arm bone is the humerus, and one of the bones in the forearm is the radius.
So the humeroradial connects the humerus to the radius.
Sometimes it is just called the RCL for radial collateral ligament.


(from: wikipedia - radial collateral ligament of elbow joint)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Parasympathetic Nervous System

Tuesday, December 19, 2017

Glenohumeral Ligaments


We just learned about the Scapula & Clavicle Ligaments.

Another group of ligaments are the Glenohumeral Ligaments that connect the humerus (upper arm bone) to the scapula (shoulder blade or wing bone), and helps hold the shoulder in place.

The scapula has a part sticking out called the coracoid process that helps it get tied to the other bones, and it has a part called the glenoid cavity which is like a rounded holder where the shoulder bone goes to help hold it in place.

The ligaments are:
- Capsule - Goes around the outside of the humerus bone
- Coracohumeral - Connects the coracoid process which is part of the scapula to the humerus bone
- Glenohumeral - Connects the glenoid cavity which is part of the scapula to the humerus bone
- Transverse humeral - Connects two parts of the humerus together
- Glenoid labrum - Helps make the glenoid cavity more stable and bigger


(from: wikipedia - articular capsule of the humerus)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Autonomic Nervous System

Tuesday, November 3, 2015

Radial and Ulnar veins


We just learned about the median cubital vein in your elbow.

The veins below that are the radial and ulnar veins that bring deoxygenated blood from your wrist and forearm, back toward your heart.

The radial vein is the vein in your wrist by your thumb where doctors will sometimes feel your pulse.


(from: wikipedia - ulnar veins)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Large Intestine

Tuesday, October 27, 2015

Median Cubital Vein


We just learned about the Axillary, Cephalic and Brachial veins in the upper arm.

There is a very important vein in the elbow area called the median cubital vein.

This vein brings blood through the elbow area and back up the arm toward the heart.

When doctors have to put medicine into your blood, or if they have to take a sample of your blood to test for something, they usually poke a needle into your median cubital vein.

This is because it is a very large vein, and very close to the top of your skin so it is easy to see and find.

(from: wikipedia - median cubital vein)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Rectum

Tuesday, October 20, 2015

Axillary, Cephalic, Brachial veins


We just learned about how the subclavian veins bring deoxygenated blood back toward the heart.

Those veins are connected to three smaller veins from the upper arm and shoulder area.
The axillary vein, cephalic vein, and brachial veins.

The cephalic vein goes up over the top of your deltoid shoulder muscle.
The axillary vein goes under your arm in your armpit.
The brachial veins are smaller veins connected to the axillary vein, that go off toward your bicep muscle.

(from: wikipedia - axillary vein)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Appendix

Tuesday, March 10, 2015

Radial & Ulnar arteries


We know that the subclavian artery in the chest goes to the axillary artery in the armpit and then the brachial artery in the upper arm.

After that it goes further down the arm, and splits into two arteries: the ulnar and radial arteries.

These arteries go right along the radius and ulna bones in the forearm.

The radial artery is the one that ends up at your wrist right by your thumb, where you can feel your pulse.

(from: wikipedia - radial artery)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Bronchioles

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Brachial Artery


We know that the subclavian artery brings oxygenated blood from the heart toward the arm, and then continues on to turn into the axillary artery.

After that it goes down the arm between your biceps and triceps and is called the brachial artery.



(from: wikipedia - brachial artery)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Bronchi

Tuesday, February 24, 2015

Axillary artery


We know that the subclavian artery brings oxygenated blood from the heart toward the arm, and splits into some other arteries like the vertebral artery, internal thoracic artery and the dorsal scapular artery.

After those other arteries split off from the subclavian artery, it keeps going and turns into the axillary artery.
This brings blood to parts of the chest, the armpit and the upper arm.


(from: wikipedia - axillary artery)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Trachea

Tuesday, October 8, 2013

Forearm supinators


Let's keep learning about the muscles in the human body!

We've now learned that the forearm flexors are used to help flex your elbow together,
the forearm extensors are used to move the back of your hand toward your forearm, or spread your fingers out.
and the forearm pronators are to turn your wrist so your hand is facing away from you.

The last of the four forearm muscles we're going to learn about is the supinator muscles.

The opposite of the pronator, the supinator is when you turn your wrist to move the palm of your hand to be toward your face. forearm supinator
(from: wikipedia - pronation)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Lumbar Vertebrae

Tuesday, October 1, 2013

Forearm pronators


Let's keep learning about the muscles in the human body!

We've now learned that the forearm flexors are used to help flex your elbow together,
and the forearm extensors are used to move the bank of your hand toward your forearm, or spread your fingers out.

The forearm does even more than that!

There is another group of muscles called pronators.
They spin your wrist around, so that your hand is pointing away from you.

pronation
(from: wikipedia - pronation)

Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Thoracic Vertebrae

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

Forearm Extensors


Let's keep learning about the muscles in the human body!

Last time we learned about how the Forearm flexors are used to help flex your elbow together.

Even though the forearm muscles are smaller than biceps, there are a few other important muscles there too.

The extensor muscles are the ones you use when you move the back of your hand up toward your forearm,
or when you open up your hand and spread out your fingers.

forearm extensors
(from: wikipedia - extrinsic extensor muscles of the hand)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Cervical Vertebrae

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Forearm flexors


In your forearm there are a few different muscles.

One of them is used to help flex the elbow together,
it is called the brachioradialis.

brachiradialis
(from: wikipedia - brachioradialis)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Thoracic Cage

Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Deltoids


Let's keep learning about the muscles in the human body!

Last time we learned about the triceps

Next up is the deltoid.

The deltoid is the muscle on the corner of your shoulder, right above where your arm is.
deltoid muscle
(from: wikipedia - deltoid muscle)

You are using your deltoid when you move your arm around at the shoulder.

Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Triceps


Let's keep learning about the muscles in the human body!

Last time we learned about the biceps

Next up is the triceps.

The tricep is the muscle on the back side of your upper arm between the shoulder and elbow,
right along your humerus bone, and on the opposite side of the bicep.

You are using your tricep when you push your arms out from your body.
triceps
(from: wikipedia - triceps)


Tuesday, July 9, 2013

Biceps


Let's start learning about the muscles in the human body!

The bicep is the muscle on the upper arm between the shoulder and elbow,
right along your humerus bone.

You are using your bicep when you pull your hand toward your shoulder.


(from: wikipedia - bicep)

Tuesday, November 20, 2012

Radius & Ulna


We just learned about the Humerus.

The bones in your forearm are called the radius and ulna.

The radius is the one on the inside top, and the ulna is the one on the outside bottom.
When you turn your hand over, your radius bone moves, but the ulna stays in one place.

radius ulna

(From: Wikipedia - radius, ulna)

Tuesday, November 13, 2012

Humerus


We just learned about the False Ribs.

The large bone for your upper arm is called your humerus.
humerus
(From: Wikipedia - humerus)

Sometimes when you bang the end of your elbow and it hurts, that's called hitting your funny bone.
Someone probably thought this up because the word humerus sounds just like humerous which means funny, and your humerus bone connects to your elbow!