Showing posts with label Hand. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Hand. Show all posts

Tuesday, February 6, 2018

Phalangeal Ligaments


We just learned about the Metacarpal Ligaments that connect your metacarpal bones together in your hand.

The metacarpal bones in the hand connect to the finger bones called phalanges, and there are phalangeal ligaments connecting the metacarpal bones together, and the finger bones together.

The joints where the bones connect has padding to keep the bones from smashing into each other, and also keeps them stuck together so they can't be pulled apart.


(from: wikipedia - metacarpophalangeal joint)

The finger bones have ligaments that go over and under the fingers, to help your fingers stretch out or close into a fist.


(from: wikipedia - palmar plate)

Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Dendrite

Tuesday, January 30, 2018

Metacarpal Ligaments


We just learned about the Intercarpal Ligaments that hold your wrist bones together.

Another group of ligaments in your hand are the Metacarpal Ligaments.

These tie the bones together in your hand, right by your big knuckles, so your hand stays together.


(from: wikipedia - deep transverse metacarpal ligament)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Nucleus

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Carpal Ligaments


We just learned about the Radioulnar ligaments that connect the forearm bones.

Another set of ligaments is the Carpal Ligaments, that connect the radius and ulna to the carpal bones in the wrist.

There are six different ligaments, all named for where they are and what they connect.
The bones are the radius, ulna and carpals.
The places are "dorsal" back or top of the hand, "palmar" palm side of the hand, and "collateral" sides of the wrist.

Dorsal radiocarpal - Top of the hand, connects radius to carpal
Dorsal ulnocarpal - Top of the hand, connects ulna to carpal

Palmar radiocarpal - Palm side of the hand, connects radius to carpal
Palmar ulnocarpal - Palm side of the hand, connects ulna to carpal

Ulnar collateral - Side of the wrist, connects ulna to carpal
Radial collateral - Side of the wrist, connects radius to carpal


(from: wikipedia - radial collateral ligament of wrist joint)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Neuron

Tuesday, July 25, 2017

Paronychium


We just learned about the Eponychium and Cuticle.

Another part of the nail is the Paronychium.

This is the skin on the left and right sides of the nail.


(from: wikipedia - nail (anatomy))


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Limbic System

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

Eponychium and Cuticle


We just learned about the Lunula.

Another two parts of the nail are the eponychium and cuticle.

The cuticle is the part of the skin right above the beginning of the nail or the lunula.
The skin on the cuticle is dead, and is sometimes removed when someone gets their nails done for a manicure.

The eponychium is the living part of the skin that is right before the cuticle, and it is where the cuticle grows from.


(from: wikipedia - eponychium)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Midbrain

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Lunula


We just learned about the Nail Plate.

Another part of the nail is the Lunula which means "little moon".

This is the small white crescent shape at the base of your nail, right where it touches the skin and your nail starts.
The lunula is connected to the matrix and the plate, and is the starting point where your nail grows out from the matrix.


(from: wikipedia - lunula (anatomy))


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Forebrain

Tuesday, July 4, 2017

Nail Plate


We just learned about the nail matrix.

Another part of the nail is the nail plate.

This is the big flat part of your nail.
When new cells are being made in the matrix, they are pushed forward to the plate, where they eventually end up at the tip of your fingernail.

(from: wikipedia - nail (anatomy))


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Diancephalon

Tuesday, June 27, 2017

Nail - Matrix


Let's learn a little more about nails.

One part of the nail is the matrix.
This is the skin underneath the very bottom part of the nail, below where the nail meets the skin.

The matrix has nerves and blood vessels, and it is the part that makes new cells that turn into the nails.


(from: wikipedia - nail (anatomy))


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Hindbrain

Tuesday, June 20, 2017

Nails


We just learned about sweat glands.

Another part of the integumentary system is the nails.

Even though nails feel hard like bones, they are actually made of something called keratin.
It's the same thing that hair is made out of too.
There are lots of parts of nails, like the plate, lunula, root, sinus, matrix, bed, hyponychium, and margin.

(from: wikipedia - nail (anatomy))


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Medulla Oblongata

Tuesday, November 17, 2015

Superficial Palmar Venous Arch


We just learned about the Dorsal Venous Network of the Hand

The veins on the bottom or palm side of your hand are called the Superficial Palmar Venous Arch.

These veins are much smaller and can't really be seen from the skin, but they are right up along the arteries in the palm.

(from: wikipedia - superficial palmar venous arch)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Capillaries

Tuesday, November 10, 2015

Dorsal Venous Network of the Hand


We just learned about the Radial and Ulnar Veins in the forearm and wrist that bring deoxygenated blood back toward the heart.

There are veins on the top or back of your hand, called the dorsal side, that stick out a lot, and are sometimes used by doctors when they need to put a needle into your veins.

These large veins are called the dorsal venous network of the hand.

The word dorsal means top, like the dorsal fin on top of a dolphin's back, so the dorsal veins are on the top or back of your hand.
The palmar veins are by the palm of your hand.


(from: wikipedia - dorsal venous network of hand)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Circulatory System

Tuesday, March 24, 2015

Palmar Digital Arteries


We know that the ulnar and radial arteries in the forearm lead to the palmar arch arteries in the palm of the hand.

After that the arteries go into the palmar digital arteries.
There are two palmar digital arteries, the common and proper.


(from: wikipedia - proper palmar digital arteries)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Blood Air Barrier

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

Palmar Arch


We know that the subclavian artery in the chest goes to the axillary artery in the armpit and then the brachial artery in the upper arm, then the ulnar and radial arteries in the forearm.

After that the radial and ulnar arteries go to the deep palmar arch and the superficial palmar arch which both bring blood to your hand.

(from: wikipedia - superficial palmar arch)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Alveoli

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

Palmar interossei hand muscles


The palmar interossei muscles in your hand are the muscles in between the metacarpal finger bones that are part of your hand.

They are used to squeeze your fingers together.
dorsal interossei
(from: wikipedia - palmar interossei)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Humerus

Tuesday, November 5, 2013

Dorsal interossei hand muscles


The dorsal interossei muscles in your hand are the muscles in between the metacarpal finger bones that are part of your hand.

They are used to spread your fingers apart.
dorsal interossei
(from: wikipedia - dorsal interossei)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: False Ribs

Tuesday, October 29, 2013

Lumbrical hand muscles


The lumbrical muscles in your hand are the muscles in between the metacarpal finger bones that are part of your hand.

They help you stick your fingers straight out.

lumbrical
(from: wikipedia - lumbricals of the hand)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Pectoral Girdle

Tuesday, October 22, 2013

Hypothenar


We just learned about the thenar muscle in the hand by the thumb.

The other big muscle in your hand that you can feel is called the hypothenar.
It's over on the side of your hand by your pinky, and it controls all the movement of your pinky finger.

hypothenar
(from: wikipedia - hypothenar)



Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Clavicle and Scapula

Tuesday, October 15, 2013

Hand muscles - Thenar


Just like the wrist muscles, there are many muscles in your hand that do different things.

Let's start with the thenar muscle.

The big muscle that's part of your thumb is called the thenar.

It's responsible for all the movements of your thumb!
thenar
(from: wikipedia - thenar eminence)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Esophagus

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

Forearm Extensors


Let's keep learning about the muscles in the human body!

Last time we learned about how the Forearm flexors are used to help flex your elbow together.

Even though the forearm muscles are smaller than biceps, there are a few other important muscles there too.

The extensor muscles are the ones you use when you move the back of your hand up toward your forearm,
or when you open up your hand and spread out your fingers.

forearm extensors
(from: wikipedia - extrinsic extensor muscles of the hand)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Cervical Vertebrae

Tuesday, December 25, 2012

Distal phalanges


The finger tip bones in your fingers are called the distal phalanges.

There are only four of them in your hand, because your thumb has one less bone than the rest of your fingers.
distalphalanges
(from: wikipedia - distal phalanges)