Showing posts with label Head. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Head. Show all posts

Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Temporomandibular Ligament


We just learned about the Skull Suture Tissue.

Another ligament is the Temporomandibular Ligament.

This is a ligament that connects the your bottom jaw to your head, right up by your ear.


(from: wikipedia - temporomandibular ligament)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Lumbar Nerves

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Skull Suture Tissue


We just learned about Cartilage.

There are some types of connective tissue that we can feel, like the cartilage in our ears and noses, or ligaments and tendons in our arms and legs.

But connective tissue is all over the body, even in our skulls!
The bones of the skull are in different pieces, and the pieces are connected with things called sutures.

When a baby is born, the skull pieces are not connected tightly together, there is just connective tissue holding them together.
As the baby gets older, the bones get closer and eventually the sutures get hard and don't move anymore.

All the different parts of the skull that are connected have a little bit of connective tissue in between them to cushion where the bones are connected.

(from: wikipedia - frontal suture)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Thoracic Nerves

Tuesday, December 1, 2015

Jugular Vein


We just learned about the Digital Veins that bring deoxygenated blood back from the fingers toward the heart.
So we've now learned about all the veins of the legs and the arms.

There is a big vein in the neck called the jugular vein, that brings deoxygenated blood back from the head toward the heart.

There are two jugular veins, the external and internal. The internal one is more inside the middle of the neck, and the external one is more toward the outside of the neck.

You can feel your pulse in the jugular vein in your neck.

After the jugular there are about 50 other small veins that connect to the brain, eyes, ears, mouth and every part of your body.


(from: wikipedia - external jugular vein)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Left Atrium

Tuesday, January 20, 2015

External Carotid Artery


We just learned that the Common Carotid Artery brings oxygenated blood up to the neck, and splits into two tubes, and one of them is the internal carotid artery which brings blood to your brain.

The other artery is the external carotid artery.

This artery gives blood to all the other parts of your head, your ears, eyes, nose, mouth, tongue, teeth and skin.


(from: wikipedia - external carotid artery)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Ear Muscles

Tuesday, January 13, 2015

Internal Carotid Artery


We just learned that the Common Carotid Artery brings oxygenated blood up to the neck area from the aortic arch.

The common carotid artery divides into two smaller tubes, one is called the internal carotid artery.

This artery goes up to give blood to your brain.


(from: wikipedia - internal carotid artery)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Eyelid Muscles

Tuesday, January 6, 2015

Common Carotid Artery


We've learned how the oxygenated blood goes up the ascending aorta and then turns at the aortic arch.

Right at the arch there are two tubes that go up your neck, called common carotid arteries.
The one on the left is called the left common carotid artery and of course the one on the right is the right common carotid artery.
They go up the side of your neck to bring oxygenated blood to your brain and all the parts of your head like mouth, eyes and nose.


(from: wikipedia - common carotid artery)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Eyebrow Muscles

Tuesday, February 4, 2014

Chewing muscles


There's a fancy word for chewing, it's called masticating.

You have two main muscles you use for chewing.
One is your jaw muscle called the masseter muscle.

masseter muscle
(from: wikipedia - masseter muscle)

The other is your temple muscle up on the side of your head, called the temporal muscle.

temporal muscle
(from: wikipedia - temporal muscle)


If you bite down hard and feel your face and the side of your head, you can feel which muscles they are.

Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Tibia & Fibula

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

Nose muscles


There are two main muscles that you can use for your nose.

When you flare your nostrils, that means your nostrils are open more.
The muscle you use to flare your nostrils is your nasalis muscle.

nasalis
(from: wikipedia - nasalis muscle)

The other nose muscle helps you raise your nose up like a snarl.

levator labii superioris alaeque nasi muscle
(from: wikipedia - levator labii superioris alaeque nasi muscle)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Patella

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

Ear muscles


Can you wiggle your ears?

We all have ear muscles, but not everyone uses them.
There are two different ear muscles.

One is the auricular.
Auris means ear, and cula means little.
auricular muscles
(from: wikipedia - auricular muscles)

The other is the temporoparietalis.
tempus means time and paries means wall.
temporoparietalis
(from: wikipedia - temporoparietalis muscles)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: femur

Tuesday, January 14, 2014

Eyelid muscles


Your eyelids have two muscles, one to open them and one to close them.

The one that closes your eyelids is called the orbicularis oculi.
orbicularis means little circle, and oculi means your eye.

orbicularis oculi
(from: wikipedia - orbicularis oculi muscle)

The one that opens your eyelids is the levator palpebrae superioris.
levator means lifter, palpebrae means eyelid, and superioris means above.

(#9 in the picture)

(from: wikipedia - levator palpebrae superioris muscle)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Pelvis, hip bone

Tuesday, January 7, 2014

Eyebrow muscles


There are two muscles that help you raise and lower your eyebrows.

The occipitofrontalis muscle raises your eyebrows like a surprised look.

The corrugator supercilii muscle lowers your eyebrows like a frown.

occipitofrontalis muscle
(from: wikipedia - occipitofrontalis muscle)

corrugator supercilii muscle
(from: wikipedia - corrugator supercilii muscle)

Kid Facts - Blast from the past: The Coccyx bone

Tuesday, December 31, 2013

Cheek muscles


We just learned about the Depressor Lip Muscles.

There are three muscles in your cheek area that help you do things like smile and whistle:

Orbicularis oris, risorius, and buccinator.

Orbicularis oris
(from: wikipedia - Orbicularis oris muscle)

risorius
(from: wikipedia - risorius)

buccinator
(from: wikipedia - buccinator muscle)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Sacrum

Tuesday, December 24, 2013

Depressor lip muscles


We learned that the muscles for the upper lip are the levator muscles.

There are three muscles in your face on the front of your chin that help push up your bottom lip:
depressor anguli oris, depressor labii inferioris, mentalis.

depressor anguli oris
(from: wikipedia - depressor anguli oris)

depressor labii inferioris
(from: wikipedia - depressor labii inferioris)

mentalis
(from: wikipedia - mentalis)

Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Distal Phalanges

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Levator Lip Muscles


We just learned about the Procerus Nose Muscle.

There are two muscles in your face that help raise your upper lip:
levator labii superioris and levator anguli oris.

The superioris muscle is the bigger one.

levator means to raise, labii means lip, superioris means upper or bigger, anguli means angled and oris means mouth.

levator labii superioris
(from: wikipedia - levator labii superioris)

levator anguli oris
(from: wikipedia - levator anguli oris)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Intermediate Phalanges

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Procerus nose muscle


We just learned about the Tongue muscle.

There is a muscle on your nose, that helps you wrinkle up your nose like when you are sniffing like a bunny.
That muscle is called your procerus muscle.
procerus
(from: wikipedia - procerus muscle)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Proximal Phalanges

Tuesday, December 3, 2013

Tongue


We just learned about the Plantar Foot Muscles.

Your tongue is also a muscle!

There are eight different muscles in your tongue, with big long names:
genioglossus, hyoglossus, styloglossus, palatoglossus, superior longitudinal, inferior longitudinal, verticalis and transversus.

Your tongue is the most flexible parts of your body, all because of so many muscles.

You can move your tongue up, down, left and right. Stick it out or pull it in.
Some people can curl it back on top or bottom, fold it in half, turn it sideways, or even make it round or flat!

It's such an important muscle that we use every day!
tongue
(from: wikipedia - tongue)



Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Hand Bones - Metacarpals

Tuesday, July 2, 2013

Hyoid bone


The very last bone in the body we're going to learn about is the hyoid bone.

It's underneath your chin, right at the top of your neck.

hyoid
(from: wikipedia - hyoid bone)

Tuesday, June 25, 2013

Ear bones - Hammer, Anvil, Stirrup


Inside your ear are three little bones that your body uses to help make the sounds you hear.

The hammer, anvil and stirrup bones vibrate in your ear so you can hear.

middle ear
(from: wikipedia - middle ear)

Sometimes people call these by their names in Latin language:
malleus (hammer), incus (anvil), stapes (stirrup)

Tuesday, June 18, 2013

Inferior nasal concha


Let's learn the last part of the facial skeleton!

We've already learned about the mandible, maxilla, nasal bone, vomer, palatine bones, zygomatic bones and lacrimal bones.

The last one is the inferior nasal concha.

It's another one of the small hidden bones behind your nose area.
inferior nasal concha
(from: wikipedia - inferior nasal concha)

Tuesday, June 11, 2013

Lacrimal bones


Let's learn the other parts of the facial skeleton!

We've already learned about the mandible, maxilla, nasal bone, vomer, palatine bones and zygomatic bones.

Next up are the lacrimal bones, right behind your nose and on the inside part of your eyes.
lacrimal bones
(from: wikipedia - lacrimal bone)