Showing posts with label Human Body. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Human Body. Show all posts

Tuesday, June 12, 2018

Maxillary First Premolar


We just learned about the Maxillary Canine.

Another tooth in the mouth is the Maxillary First Premolar, also sometimes called the bicuspids.

Just like the canine teeth had one "cusp" on them, these teeth have two cusps, which is why they are sometimes called bicuspids.

These teeth are used to help grind up the food in your mouth, but they also have sharp pointed ends so they can be used to bite down into food and help tear it up.

For baby or primary teeth, there are no premolars, only incisors, canines and molars.
When the first baby molar tooth comes out, the first premolar comes up in it's place.



(from: wikipedia - maxillary first premolar)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Sweat Glands

Tuesday, June 5, 2018

Maxillary Canine


We just learned about the Maxillary Lateral Incisor.

Another tooth is the Maxillary Canine, also sometimes called the cuspid.

These are the teeth right next to the front four incisors.
Remember starting from the middle, there are two of each type of teeth:
Central Incisors
Maxillary Lateral Incisors

The Maxillary Canines are a little different than the incisors, because they have a "cusp" on them, meaning they have pointed ends, almost like a dog's tooth.
That's really why they are called "canine" teeth, because canine is another word for a dog, and it you look in a dog's mouth you will see some very sharp pointy teeth!
It's also why sometimes they are called the "cuspid" teeth, because they have a cusp on them.

The canines are like a tooth that can work as an incisor to cut and tear food, but also like the bigger teeth that help you grind up and chew your food once it's in your mouth.

The canine is the longest tooth in the mouth.



(from: wikipedia - maxillary canine)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Hair - Sebaceous Gland

Tuesday, May 29, 2018

Maxillary Lateral Incisor


We just learned about the Central Incisors.

The next set of teeth that show up in your mouth are the Maxillary Lateral Incisor.

These are right next to the two front teeth, one on either side.
Just like the central incisors they are used for cutting and biting things.



(from: wikipedia - maxillary lateral incisor)

Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Hair Muscle

Tuesday, May 22, 2018

Central Incisors


We just learned about the Baby Teeth.

Usually the first baby teeth that people get are the Central Incisors.

Most babies start with two front bottom teeth, and then later the two front top teeth come in.
These incisors are made to be sharp and bite through things like carrots.


(from: wikipedia - maxillary central incisor)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Hair Root Sheath

Tuesday, May 15, 2018

Baby Teeth


We just started learned about human teeth!

Humans are usually born with no teeth, and around six months after they are born the teeth start to pop out!
We call these first teeth Baby Teeth, and they are also known as milk teeth, temporary teeth, primary teeth or deciduous teeth.

There are twenty baby teeth that come in, with ten on top and ten on bottom.
They usually start with the bottom middle ones, then the top middle and then next on the bottom and top until all twenty are in.

The baby teeth are very important, because they help keep the jaw strong and in the right place, and they are holding a place for the bigger adult teeth that come in later.


(from: wikipedia - deciduous teeth)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Hair Plexus

Tuesday, May 8, 2018

Teeth


Let's keep learning about the Human Mouth.

Probably the most important part of your mouth is your Teeth.

An adult human can have up to 32 teeth, that's a lot of chompers!

People grow two sets of teeth, 20 baby teeth, and then those fall out and we get the grown up teeth.


(from: wikipedia - human tooth)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Hair Growth

Tuesday, May 1, 2018

Human Mouth


We've learned a lot about the Connective Tissue that holds all of our bones and muscles together!

Another part of the human body is the Mouth.

We might not think about it much, but there is a lot going on in the mouth.
We use it to eat, drink and breathe, and we also use it to make words when we talk, or make sounds like whistles clicking or snapping with our lips and tongue.

From our teeth, to our lips and tongue, there are a lot of things to take care of in our mouths, and the professional person we go to see that takes care of our mouth is usually a dentist.

There are also orthodontists who work on moving teeth around, periodontists who work on the bones supporting the teeth, endodontists who specialize on the inside of the tooth, prosthodontists who work on building replacement teeth, and oral and maxillofacial surgeons who work on the areas around the jaw.


(from: wikipedia - dentist)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Hair Follicle

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Interphalangeal Ligaments


We just learned about the Metatarsal Ligaments.

Another set of connective tissue is the Interphalangeal Ligaments.

These are the ligaments that go underneath (plantar) and on the sides (collateral) of each toe.


(from: wikipedia - interphalangeal joints of foot)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Hair

Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Metatarsal Ligaments


We just learned about the Distal Intertarsal Ligaments.

Another group of connective tissue in the foot is called the Metatarsal ligaments.

The metatarsal bones are the long bones in your foot between your ankle and your toes.
There are five metatarsal bones, one for each toe.

The metatarsals have ligaments connecting them to the ankle bones, to each other, and to the toe bones.


- Tarsometatarsal - Connects the tarsus (ankle) to the metatarsals (foot) on plantar (bottom) and dorsal (top).

- Intermetatarsal - Connects the metatarsal (foot) bones to themselves, on dorsal (top), plantar (bottom) and interosseous (in between) and transverse (across).

- Metatarsophalangeal - Connects the metatarsal (foot) bones to the phalanges (toe) bones, on plantar (bottom) and side (collateral).


(from: wikipedia - tarsometatarsal joints)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Adnexa

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Distal Intertarsal Ligaments


We just learned about the Transverse Tarsal Ligaments.

Another group of ligaments in the foot is the Distal Intertarsal Ligaments.

Just like the transverse tarsal ligaments, these connect the foot bones in your foot together.
Even though your foot is not that big, there are seven bones from your heel to the middle of your foot, and that doesn't even include the longer bones in your foot that connect to your toes!

The distal intertarsal ligaments connect the bones that are past your heel and your main foot bone. The 3 cuneiform bones, the navicular bone and the cuboid bone are the smaller bones right before the longer metatarsal bones in your foot.

They are named for plantar (bottom), dorsal (top) or inter/interosseous (in between).
Cuneonavicular - Connects your cuneiform to navicular. (plantar and dorsal)
Cuboideonavicular - Connects your cuboid to navicular. (plantar and dorsal)
Intercuneiform - Connects your 3 cuneiform bones together. (plantar, dorsal and interosseous)


(from: wikipedia - plantar calcaneonavicular)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Hypodermis

Tuesday, April 3, 2018

Transverse Tarsal Ligaments


We just learned about the Talocalcaneal Ligaments.

Another bunch of ligaments are the Transverse Tarsal Ligaments.

These are the ligaments that tie a bunch of foot bones together:
- Calcaneus: heel bone
- Talus: ankle bone
- Navicularis: top of foot bone
- Cuboid: outside of foot bone

Remember the location words, like dorsal means on top, plantar means on bottom, bifurcated means split into two.

There are 7 ligaments that tie all these together.
- dorsal talonavicular: Connects the talus to the navicularis on the top.
- plantar calcaneonavicular: Connects the calcaneus to the navicularis on the bottom.
- bifurcated (calcaneonavicular): Splits into two and connects the calcaneus to the navicularis in the middle.
- dorsal calcaneocuboid: Connects the calcaneus to the cuboid on the top.
- long plantar: Connects the calcaneus to the cuboid on the bottom. It is the longest of the foot ligaments.
- plantar calcaneocuboid: Connects the calcaneus to the cuboid on the bottom. It is shorter than the long plantar and connects at a different spot.
- bifurcated (calcaneocuboid): Splits into two and connects the calcaneus to the cuboid bone in the middle.


(from: wikipedia - plantar calacneonavicular ligament)


(from: wikipedia - navicular bone)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Dermis

Tuesday, March 27, 2018

Talocalcaneal Ligaments


We just learned about the Talocrural and Ankle Ligaments.

Another group of ligaments are the Subtalar and Talocalcaneal Ligaments.

The talus and calcaneus are two of the seven ankle and foot bones.
The talus is the middle foot bone, and the calcaneus is the heel.

Posterior is for back, anterior is for front, lateral is for outside, medial is for inside, and interossus is for in between.
There five talocalcaneal ligaments: anterior, posterior, lateral, medial and interosseous


(from: wikipedia - anterior talocalcaneal ligament)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Epidermis

Tuesday, March 20, 2018

Talocrural and ankle ligaments


We just learned about the Inferior Tibiofibular Joint connecting the tibia to the fibula.

Another set of ligaments are the Talocrural and ankle ligaments.
These connect the tibia and fibula of the lower leg to the talus, navicular and calcaneus bones of the foot.

There are a bunch of ligaments in this area to make sure your ankle works right, and all the bones are tied together.

They all have big names, but they make sense based on the two bones they are connecting:

tibiotalar (anterior/posterior) - connects the tibia (shin bone) to the talus (middle foot bone)
tibiocalcaneal - connects the tibia to the calcaneus (heel bone)
tibionavicular - connects the tibia to the navicular (foot bone)
talofibular (anterior/posterior) - connects the fibula (inside lower leg bone) to the talus
calcaneofibular - connects the fibula to the calcaneus


(from: wikipedia - calcaneofibular ligament)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Skin

Tuesday, March 13, 2018

Inferior Tibiofibular Joint


We just learned about the Superior Tibiofibular Ligaments.

Another piece of connective tissue is the Inferior Tibiofibular Joint.

This is down by the ankle, connecting the tibia and fibula together at the bottom.
There are 3 ligaments in total. Anterior for the front side, posterior for the back side, and an interosseous membrane in the middle.

(from: wikipedia - inferior tibiofibular joint)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Integumentary System

Tuesday, March 6, 2018

Superior Tibiofibular Ligaments


We just learned about the Patellar Ligament.

Another set of connective tissue is the Superior Tibiofibular Ligaments.

These are the ligaments up by the knee that connect the tibia (shin bone) to the fibula, the smaller bone in the lower leg.

There are two ligaments that tie the tops of the tibia and fibula together.
They are called the anterior (front) of the head of the fibula, and the posterior (back) of the head of the fibula.
The two bones are right next to each other, and at the top there is some connective tissue almost glueing them together.


(from: wikipedia - superior tibiofibular joint)


(from: wikipedia - posterior ligament of the head of the fibula)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Axon Terminal

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

Patellar Ligament


We just learned about the Medial and Lateral Meniscus.

Another piece of connective tissue is the Patellar Ligament.

This is the ligament that connects the kneecap to the shin bone.
The kneecap is called the patella, and the shin bone is called the tibia.


(from: wikipedia - patellar ligament)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Node of Ranvier

Tuesday, February 20, 2018

Medial and Lateral Meniscus


We just learned about the Knee Ligaments.

Another important connective tissue is the meniscus in the knee.

When you have more than one meniscus, it is called menisci.
The meniscus is like the rubber padding on your tibia where your fibula touches so it does not hit the other bone.

The two menisci in the knee are the medial and lateral meniscus.
Medial means closer to the middle of the body, and lateral means further from the middle of the body.
So the medial meniscus is on the inside part of your leg, and the lateral meniscus is on the outside part of your leg.

(from: wikipedia - medial meniscus)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Schwann Cell

Tuesday, February 13, 2018

Knee Ligaments


We just learned about the Hip & Femur Ligaments.

Another set of ligaments are the Knee Ligaments.

There are four main ligaments that connect the femur bone in the thigh, to the tibia and fibula bones of the lower leg.

The Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) connects the back of the femur to the front of the tiba. It helps keep the knee from twisting.
The Posterior Cruciate Ligament (PCL) connects the front of the femur to the back of the tibia.
The Medial Cruciate Ligament (MCL) connects the inside of the femur to the inside of the tibia.
The Lateral Cruciate Ligament (LCL) connects the outside of the femur to the fibula.


(from: wikipedia - anterior cruciate ligament)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Myelin Sheath

Tuesday, February 6, 2018

Hip & Femur Ligaments


We just learned about the Phalangeal Ligaments.

Another ligament connects the Hip to the Femur.

There are a few different ligaments, tied to the femur from different parts of the hip: The ischiofemoral, pubofemoral and iliofemoral ligaments.

The iliofemoral connecting the upper part of the hip to the femur is the strongest ligament in the whole body, and can support over 700 pounds of weight!


(from: wikipedia - iliofemoral ligament)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Axon

Tuesday, January 30, 2018

Phalangeal Ligaments


We just learned about the Metacarpal Ligaments that connect your metacarpal bones together in your hand.

The metacarpal bones in the hand connect to the finger bones called phalanges, and there are phalangeal ligaments connecting the metacarpal bones together, and the finger bones together.

The joints where the bones connect has padding to keep the bones from smashing into each other, and also keeps them stuck together so they can't be pulled apart.


(from: wikipedia - metacarpophalangeal joint)

The finger bones have ligaments that go over and under the fingers, to help your fingers stretch out or close into a fist.


(from: wikipedia - palmar plate)

Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Dendrite