Showing posts with label Connective Tissue. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Connective Tissue. Show all posts

Tuesday, March 27, 2018

Talocalcaneal Ligaments


We just learned about the Talocrural and Ankle Ligaments.

Another group of ligaments are the Subtalar and Talocalcaneal Ligaments.

The talus and calcaneus are two of the seven ankle and foot bones.
The talus is the middle foot bone, and the calcaneus is the heel.

Posterior is for back, anterior is for front, lateral is for outside, medial is for inside, and interossus is for in between.
There five talocalcaneal ligaments: anterior, posterior, lateral, medial and interosseous


(from: wikipedia - anterior talocalcaneal ligament)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Epidermis

Tuesday, March 20, 2018

Talocrural and ankle ligaments


We just learned about the Inferior Tibiofibular Joint connecting the tibia to the fibula.

Another set of ligaments are the Talocrural and ankle ligaments.
These connect the tibia and fibula of the lower leg to the talus, navicular and calcaneus bones of the foot.

There are a bunch of ligaments in this area to make sure your ankle works right, and all the bones are tied together.

They all have big names, but they make sense based on the two bones they are connecting:

tibiotalar (anterior/posterior) - connects the tibia (shin bone) to the talus (middle foot bone)
tibiocalcaneal - connects the tibia to the calcaneus (heel bone)
tibionavicular - connects the tibia to the navicular (foot bone)
talofibular (anterior/posterior) - connects the fibula (inside lower leg bone) to the talus
calcaneofibular - connects the fibula to the calcaneus


(from: wikipedia - calcaneofibular ligament)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Skin

Tuesday, March 13, 2018

Inferior Tibiofibular Joint


We just learned about the Superior Tibiofibular Ligaments.

Another piece of connective tissue is the Inferior Tibiofibular Joint.

This is down by the ankle, connecting the tibia and fibula together at the bottom.
There are 3 ligaments in total. Anterior for the front side, posterior for the back side, and an interosseous membrane in the middle.

(from: wikipedia - inferior tibiofibular joint)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Integumentary System

Tuesday, March 6, 2018

Superior Tibiofibular Ligaments


We just learned about the Patellar Ligament.

Another set of connective tissue is the Superior Tibiofibular Ligaments.

These are the ligaments up by the knee that connect the tibia (shin bone) to the fibula, the smaller bone in the lower leg.

There are two ligaments that tie the tops of the tibia and fibula together.
They are called the anterior (front) of the head of the fibula, and the posterior (back) of the head of the fibula.
The two bones are right next to each other, and at the top there is some connective tissue almost glueing them together.


(from: wikipedia - superior tibiofibular joint)


(from: wikipedia - posterior ligament of the head of the fibula)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Axon Terminal

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

Patellar Ligament


We just learned about the Medial and Lateral Meniscus.

Another piece of connective tissue is the Patellar Ligament.

This is the ligament that connects the kneecap to the shin bone.
The kneecap is called the patella, and the shin bone is called the tibia.


(from: wikipedia - patellar ligament)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Node of Ranvier

Tuesday, February 20, 2018

Medial and Lateral Meniscus


We just learned about the Knee Ligaments.

Another important connective tissue is the meniscus in the knee.

When you have more than one meniscus, it is called menisci.
The meniscus is like the rubber padding on your tibia where your fibula touches so it does not hit the other bone.

The two menisci in the knee are the medial and lateral meniscus.
Medial means closer to the middle of the body, and lateral means further from the middle of the body.
So the medial meniscus is on the inside part of your leg, and the lateral meniscus is on the outside part of your leg.

(from: wikipedia - medial meniscus)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Schwann Cell

Tuesday, February 13, 2018

Knee Ligaments


We just learned about the Hip & Femur Ligaments.

Another set of ligaments are the Knee Ligaments.

There are four main ligaments that connect the femur bone in the thigh, to the tibia and fibula bones of the lower leg.

The Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) connects the back of the femur to the front of the tiba. It helps keep the knee from twisting.
The Posterior Cruciate Ligament (PCL) connects the front of the femur to the back of the tibia.
The Medial Cruciate Ligament (MCL) connects the inside of the femur to the inside of the tibia.
The Lateral Cruciate Ligament (LCL) connects the outside of the femur to the fibula.


(from: wikipedia - anterior cruciate ligament)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Myelin Sheath

Tuesday, February 6, 2018

Hip & Femur Ligaments


We just learned about the Phalangeal Ligaments.

Another ligament connects the Hip to the Femur.

There are a few different ligaments, tied to the femur from different parts of the hip: The ischiofemoral, pubofemoral and iliofemoral ligaments.

The iliofemoral connecting the upper part of the hip to the femur is the strongest ligament in the whole body, and can support over 700 pounds of weight!


(from: wikipedia - iliofemoral ligament)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Axon

Tuesday, January 30, 2018

Phalangeal Ligaments


We just learned about the Metacarpal Ligaments that connect your metacarpal bones together in your hand.

The metacarpal bones in the hand connect to the finger bones called phalanges, and there are phalangeal ligaments connecting the metacarpal bones together, and the finger bones together.

The joints where the bones connect has padding to keep the bones from smashing into each other, and also keeps them stuck together so they can't be pulled apart.


(from: wikipedia - metacarpophalangeal joint)

The finger bones have ligaments that go over and under the fingers, to help your fingers stretch out or close into a fist.


(from: wikipedia - palmar plate)

Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Dendrite

Tuesday, January 23, 2018

Metacarpal Ligaments


We just learned about the Intercarpal Ligaments that hold your wrist bones together.

Another group of ligaments in your hand are the Metacarpal Ligaments.

These tie the bones together in your hand, right by your big knuckles, so your hand stays together.


(from: wikipedia - deep transverse metacarpal ligament)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Nucleus

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Intercarpal Ligaments


We just learned about the Carpal Ligaments that connect the forearm bones to the carpal wrist bones.

Another group of ligaments are the Intercarpal Ligaments that connect the carpals to each other.

There are eight different carpal bones in the wrist, so these ligaments connect them all together.


(from: wikipedia - pisometacarpal ligament)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Soma

Tuesday, January 9, 2018

Carpal Ligaments


We just learned about the Radioulnar ligaments that connect the forearm bones.

Another set of ligaments is the Carpal Ligaments, that connect the radius and ulna to the carpal bones in the wrist.

There are six different ligaments, all named for where they are and what they connect.
The bones are the radius, ulna and carpals.
The places are "dorsal" back or top of the hand, "palmar" palm side of the hand, and "collateral" sides of the wrist.

Dorsal radiocarpal - Top of the hand, connects radius to carpal
Dorsal ulnocarpal - Top of the hand, connects ulna to carpal

Palmar radiocarpal - Palm side of the hand, connects radius to carpal
Palmar ulnocarpal - Palm side of the hand, connects ulna to carpal

Ulnar collateral - Side of the wrist, connects ulna to carpal
Radial collateral - Side of the wrist, connects radius to carpal


(from: wikipedia - radial collateral ligament of wrist joint)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Neuron

Tuesday, January 2, 2018

Radioulnar Ligaments


We just learned about the Ulnar Collateral Ligament in the elbow.

The two bones in the forearm are connected together by a few ligaments that hold on to them, like strings strapping the two bones together.

The Proximal Radioulnar Articulation is by the elbow, and the Distal Radioulndar Articulation is by the wrist.



(from: wikipedia - annular ligament of radius)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Enteric Nervous System

Tuesday, December 26, 2017

Ulnar Collateral Ligament


We just learned about the Humeroradial Ligaments or RCL that connects the upper arm called the humerus to one of the forearm bones called the radius.

Another bunch of connective tissue connects the humerus to the other forearm bone called the ulna.
This is the Ulnar Collateral Ligament, sometimes just called the UCL.

Just like the RCL, the UCL helps hold the elbow joint together when you move your arm around.


(from: wikipedia - ulnar collateral ligament of elbow joint)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Parasympathetic Nervous System

Tuesday, December 19, 2017

Humeroradial Ligaments


We just learned about the Glenhumoral Ligaments in the shoulder.

Another piece of connective tissue is the Humeroradial Ligaments.

The upper arm bone is the humerus, and one of the bones in the forearm is the radius.
So the humeroradial connects the humerus to the radius.
Sometimes it is just called the RCL for radial collateral ligament.


(from: wikipedia - radial collateral ligament of elbow joint)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Sympathetic Nervous System

Tuesday, December 12, 2017

Glenohumeral Ligaments


We just learned about the Scapula & Clavicle Ligaments.

Another group of ligaments are the Glenohumeral Ligaments that connect the humerus (upper arm bone) to the scapula (shoulder blade or wing bone), and helps hold the shoulder in place.

The scapula has a part sticking out called the coracoid process that helps it get tied to the other bones, and it has a part called the glenoid cavity which is like a rounded holder where the shoulder bone goes to help hold it in place.

The ligaments are:
- Capsule - Goes around the outside of the humerus bone
- Coracohumeral - Connects the coracoid process which is part of the scapula to the humerus bone
- Glenohumeral - Connects the glenoid cavity which is part of the scapula to the humerus bone
- Transverse humeral - Connects two parts of the humerus together
- Glenoid labrum - Helps make the glenoid cavity more stable and bigger


(from: wikipedia - articular capsule of the humerus)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Autonomic Nervous System

Tuesday, December 5, 2017

Scapula & Clavicle Ligaments


We just learned about the Sternoclavicular Ligaments that connect your clavicle to your ribs and sternum.

We learned long ago that the clavicle (collarbone) and scapula (shoulder blade or wing bone) work together to hold the ribs and shoulders.

Another group of ligaments are the ones connecting the Scapula & Clavicle.

They are connected with a few different ligaments, at different parts of the bones.

The coracoid process and acromion are two parts of the scapula that stick out and hang on to ligaments that are tied to the clavicle.

The ligaments are:
Acromioclavicular - connects the clavicle to the acromion
Coracoclavicular - connects the clavicle to the coracoid process
Coracoacromial - connects the acromion to the coracoid process
Superior/inferior transverse scapular - covers part of the scapula to help hold nerves and blood vessels

(from: wikipedia - coracoacromial ligament)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Brachial Plexus

Tuesday, November 28, 2017

Sternoclavicular Ligaments


We just learned about the Posterior Sacroiliac Ligament that connects your hip to your tailbone.

Another connective tissue way up by the shoulder is the Sternoclavicular Ligaments.

Remember the Sternum is the bone in the middle of your chest, and the Clavicle is the collar bone that connects the sternum to the shoulder.

There are 4 different Sternoclavicular ligaments, that connect to different parts of the body:

Anterior sternoclavicular (connects the clavicle to the front of the sternum)
Posterior sternoclavicular (connects the clavicle to the back of the sternum)
Interclavicular (connects the left and right clavicles)
Costoclavicular (connects the clavicle to the ribs)


(from: wikipedia - anterior sternoclavicular)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Coccygeal Plexus

Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Posterior Sacroiliac Ligament


We just learned about the Costoxiphoid Ligaments that connects the ribs to the xiphoid process.

Another piece of connective tissue is the Posterior Sacroiliac Ligament.

This is a large bunch of tissue that connects the sacrum (tailbone) to the ilium (hip bone), on the posterior (back) part of the body.


(from: wikipedia - posterior sacroiliac ligament)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Sacral Plexus

Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Costoxiphoid Ligaments


We just learned about the Superior Costotransverse Ligament that connects your spine to your ribs.

Another piece of connective tissue in the body is the Costoxiphoid Ligaments.

These are ligaments that connect the rib, sometimes named the "costo" to the xiphoid process in the middle of the chest.


(from: wikipedia - costoxiphoid ligaments)


Kid Facts - Blast from the past: Lumbar Plexus